THOUGHT LEADERSHIP

From a successful career in corporate America, providing creativity and strategic direction to game changing companies  and their CEOs, Martha Pease now brings a fresh, insightful voice to television news and the challenges facing our leaders in both politics and business.

 

Just as she does in the highly complex, competitive world of big business, she expertly cuts through the din – on air and online.

 

Martha authoritatively analyzes the relationship between newsmakers and the audiences watching, and unpacks why newsmakers get into or out of trouble.

  • How gender could win Trump the White House
    How gender could win Trump the White House
  • How gender could win Trump the White House
    How gender could win Trump the White House
    Conventional wisdom holds that women's opposition to Donald Trump will sink him this November, and there is plenty of reason to believe that. A CNN poll found some 73% of all women disapprove of him, the highest gender opposition ever seen for a major candidate.
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  • Donald Trump; last of the flamboyant CEOs?
    Donald Trump; last of the flamboyant CEOs?
  • Donald Trump; last of the flamboyant CEOs?
    Donald Trump; last of the flamboyant CEOs?
    For months, Donald Trump's success as a campaigner has perplexed most observers (including me). How could he defy gravity so long? But the longer his success in the polls goes on, the more it appears we are watching him through the wrong lens. Instead of looking at him as a politician, we should see him in the role he knows best: Celebrity CEO.
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  • Clinton and Colbert facing same problem?
    Clinton and Colbert facing same problem?
  • Clinton and Colbert facing same problem?
    Clinton and Colbert facing same problem?
    From politics to showbiz, Hillary Clinton to Stephen Colbert, we have seen more revealing examples over the past week of how crucial authenticity is to winning over Americans in this new era. And while Clinton and Colbert are both huge talents in their fields, they face surprisingly similar risks.
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  • Why isn't Hillary Clinton doing better with women voters?
    Why isn't Hillary Clinton doing better with women voters?
  • Why isn't Hillary Clinton doing better with women voters?
    Why isn't Hillary Clinton doing better with women voters?
    It's been a tough year for political prognosticators. First, almost all of them told us that Donald Trump's candidacy would be collapsing by now. Instead, the latest CNN/ORC poll shows that he is ahead of his closest Republican rival by 2-to-1.
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  • Hillary Clinton's sneakily brilliant launch
    Hillary Clinton's sneakily brilliant launch
  • Hillary Clinton's sneakily brilliant launch
    Hillary Clinton's sneakily brilliant launch
    This week, Hillary Clinton surprised the world yet again — not with the official launch of her campaign but for the unconventional way she did it. She sure pushed the envelope. With her video, new logo and road trip, she opened a long communications campaign not only to "rebrand" herself but to completely reframe who she is, what she stands for and how she intends to run. We'll find out over the next year and a half whether it will work. Many in the press and on late-night television scratched their heads this week; others were scathing.
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  • Hillary Clinton's authenticity problem
    Hillary Clinton's authenticity problem
  • Hillary Clinton's authenticity problem
    Hillary Clinton's authenticity problem
    Hillary Clinton worked hard last week to put the "dead end" sign on the State Department email story by announcing there was nothing to find. But in her rush to control the narrative, Clinton may have (once again) missed the bigger picture: In politics as much as in business, authenticity matters.
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  • Google Glass, what went wrong?
    Google Glass, what went wrong?
  • Google Glass, what went wrong?
    Google Glass, what went wrong?
    In the movie "Field of Dreams," Kevin Costner plays Ray Kinsella, a man who listens to a voice inside his head. The voice tells Ray to plow under his sole source of income -- his Iowa cornfield -- and build a baseball diamond for the ghosts of long dead Chicago Black Sox stars to come play in. The voice in his head says don't test out the idea, don't talk to anyone to see if it'll work, just build it, and they will come. Kinsella builds the field, the ghosts of the players arrive, and he's vindicated. That's how it works in the movies.
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  • Will Uber try to end its narcissism?
    Will Uber try to end its narcissism?
  • Will Uber try to end its narcissism?
    Will Uber try to end its narcissism?
    Uber, the ride-sharing service, is once again in the spotlight for a PR nightmare of its own making. Stunningly, executive Emil Michael suggested -- in what may have been off-the-record comments -- that the company might not be above threatening journalists who criticize Uber.
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  • Hazmat suits a way to block the Ebola stigma
    Hazmat suits a way to block the Ebola stigma
  • Hazmat suits a way to block the Ebola stigma
    Hazmat suits a way to block the Ebola stigma
    As we learned in past battles with polio and AIDS, the key to solving a massive health crisis is to move public sentiment away from fear and stigmatization toward action and acceptance. That is why a recent ad campaign about Ebola from Medicins Du Monde -- MDM or Doctors of the World -- is so encouraging. An international humanitarian and medical organization with a long history of advocating for vulnerable populations, MDM joined in the United States with ad agency Publicis Kaplan Thaler to turn public fear of Ebola on its head by asking people to donate a hazmat suit to workers in Africa. The symbol of the fearful hazmat suit is reintroduced as a crucial piece of the solution: "Here it's a costume. There it saves lives."
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  • Why women don't get raises
    Why women don't get raises
  • Why women don't get raises
    Why women don't get raises
    In American business great CEOs embody their companies. They persuasively connect their companies' brands to the emotions, desires, aspirations and, yes, the fears and challenges of consumers -- men and women alike. Jack Welch of General Electric, Roger Enrico of PepsiCo, Howard Schultz of Starbucks, Steve Jobs of Apple all come to mind. A great CEO is a company's No. 1 salesperson. Yet Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has showed himself as just the opposite, last week whipping up the justified anger of women in the workforce with advice that they should wait patiently for pay raises.
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  • NFL should curb Goodell's control over discipline
    NFL should curb Goodell's control over discipline
  • NFL should curb Goodell's control over discipline
    NFL should curb Goodell's control over discipline
    When leaders get into trouble these days, they often complain that they have too little power to be effective. Yet as debate rages about the NFL's handling of player discipline, the problem for NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell is just the opposite: He seems to have too much power.
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  • You pay taxes, and rich corporations don't
    You pay taxes, and rich corporations don't
  • You pay taxes, and rich corporations don't
    You pay taxes, and rich corporations don't
    Some of the world's most well-known companies like Apple, Google, Facebook, Boots and Starbucks have become successful partly by convincing us through their products that their corporate values align with consumers' personal values. But what happens when these companies behave in ways that seem to betray our trust? What if you find out that these companies keep their huge profits offshore and out of reach of domestic tax authorities?
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  • Can Uber justify its high-flying value?
    Can Uber justify its high-flying value?
  • Can Uber justify its high-flying value?
    Can Uber justify its high-flying value?
    In the blink of an eye, Uber has emerged as one of the most esteemed companies in the United States, soaring in recent days to a market value of $18.2 billion. That's bigger than Hertz and Avis combined. But is the Uber story really as good as it seems? Taxicab drivers clogging the streets of Europe this past week, protesting against Uber, are only part of the challenge. Far more dangerous could be an emerging pattern of not paying sufficient respect to customers.
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  • Empathy: the hardest working approach in business
    Empathy: the hardest working approach in business
  • Empathy: the hardest working approach in business
    Empathy: the hardest working approach in business
    Change is happening so fast these days, it seems like even the lightning-quick scribes in the blogosphere are running out of snappy metaphors to explain the mercurial business climate. Consumers’ habits are changing as quickly if not quicker than companies can roll out new products and services. At the same time, the margin between success and failure, particularly for companies seeking to compete in small to mid-markets (ie, those who can’t afford billion dollar missteps), is becoming a razor-thin wire to walk on.
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  • BraInfluence Podcast: EP #58: How to Create 100% Customer Focus with Martha Pease
    BraInfluence Podcast: EP #58: How to Create 100% Customer Focus with Martha Pease
  • BraInfluence Podcast: EP #58: How to Create 100% Customer Focus with Martha Pease
    BraInfluence Podcast: EP #58: How to Create 100% Customer Focus with Martha Pease
    “Joining The Brainfluence Podcast this week is Martha Pease, the CEO of DemandWerks. Martha is a thought leader, executive, entrepreneur, and trusted advisor at the intersection of technology innovation, marketing strategy and consumer accountability.”
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